The innate lymphoid cell (ILC) family comsists of cytotoxic natural killer (NK) cells and cytokine-producing helper-like ILCs, which are further divided into three groups based on the cytokines they produce and the expression of key transcription factors. Currently, we are mainly interested in group 2 ILCs. We previously found ILC2s in mouse lungs and shown them to produce large amounts of Th2-type cytokines that drive l allergic inflammation (Halim et al. Immunity 2012a). We also developed ILC2-deficient mice and shown that ILC2s are critical for allergen-induced lung inflammation (Halim et al. Immunity 2012b). ILC2s also promotethe differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells into Th2 cells (Halim et al. Immunity  2014). More recently, we have shown that activated lung ILC2s acquire antigen non-specific memory functions and drive severe allergic lung inflammation upon allergen re-exposure (Martinez-Gonzalez et al. Immunity 2018).

Our current research projects include:

  1. Investigation of ILC2 heterogeneity by single cell RNA sequencing, multi-color flow cytometry and functional analyses.
  2. Studies on the development and activation of lung ILC2s in the neonatal period and their role in adult lung immunity.
  3. Studies on tissue resident versus migratory ILC2s and their role in various inflammatory diseases.
  4. Analyses of ILC3s in mouse lungs.

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