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Dr. Andrew Minchinton

Head, Radiation Biology Unit - Department of Integrative Oncology


aim@bccrc.ca     Office 10-110 • 675 West 10th Ave, Vancouver       +1 604 675 8032


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CURRENT GROUP MEMBERS

Andrew Minchinton, PhD  - PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR -  aim@bccrc.ca 
Alastair Kyle, PhD  - STAFF SCIENTIST -  akyle@bccrc.ca
Jennifer Baker, PhD  - STAFF SCIENTIST -  jbaker@bccrc.ca 
Judit Banath, PhD - RESEARCH ASSOCIATE jbanath@bccrc.ca
Taixiang Wang BSc - Master student  txwang@bccrc.ca
NanNan (Anam) Liu BSc - Master student  aliu@bccrc.ca 
Xinhe (Sheena) Liu MSc - RESEARCH ASSISTANT  sliu@bccrc.ca
Karen Fryer BSc - PROJECT MANAGER  kfryer@bccrc.ca
 

RECENT GROUP MEMBERS

Maria Jose Gandolfo MSc - Research assistant, Megan Gilmour BSc - Research assistant, Paul Habington MSc - Research assistant, Jiechuang Su PhD - Post Doctoral Fellow, Roland Chiu PhD - visiting scientist (Maastricht University, The Netherlands), Robyn Seipp PhD - Post Doctoral Fellow, Matthew Smith PhD - Post Doctoral Fellow, Brita Sorensen PhD - Post Doctoral Fellow, Kristin Lindquist - MSc UBC, Jordan Cran - MSc UBC, Tania Karan - MSc UBC,  Haley Patrick - UBC coop student, Yiwei Han - UBC coop student, Karlo Kordic - SFU coop student, Susie Pavone - SFU coop student, Natalie Firmino - SFU coop student, Jennifer Suen - UBC coop student.

Current AIM lab members



COURSES TAUGHT (2013-2014)

Physics & Astronomy, University of British Columbia - PHYSICS 405/536 [Radiation physics, radiochemistry, radiation biology & radiation pathology]
Interdisciplinary Oncology Program, University of British Columbia - ONCO 502 - Concepts in Oncology - topics important in cancer biology
 

LABORATORY OPENINGS

Candidates should contact Taixiang Wang •  txwang@bccrc.ca



RESEARCH


Tumour Microenvironment

The tumour microenvironment is heterogeneous, both biochemically and structurally. Abnormal vasculature (with inter-vascular distances reaching 300µm or ~40 cell diameters) and dysregulated cell proliferation result in microregional gradients in nutrients, oxygen and drugs. 

This biochemical and structural heterogeneity has consequences for cancer treatment. Cells located far from blood vessels are difficult for drugs to reach and because they have little oxygen, are resistant to radiotherapy.

Our group is interested in how the tumour microenvironment influences anticancer treatments including radiation and chemotherapy and have developed methodologies to quantitatively examine the extravascular distribution and effects of small and large molecular weight anticancer agents.

 


Hypoxia

Hypoxic cells are commonly found in solid cancers and their presence diminishes the effectiveness of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Hypoxia arises either because cells become located distal to blood vessels and intervening cells exhaust the oxygen supply or because of transient changes in vessel perfusion. We have developed quantitative methodologies to assess tumour oxygenation and are developing methods of targeting hypoxia with drugs to increase the effectiveness of radio- and chemotherapy.

 

 cord sunburst 12



3D Tissue Engineering

Cells grown on permeable support membranes can be used to model the tumour microenvironment and we have used these systems to measure gradients in oxygenation, cell proliferation, anticancer drugs and their activity. Initially seeded as monolayers they can grow to thicknesses of ~500µm depending on conditions and cell line. By examining flux of drugs through these cultures or by examining the effects of drugs on proliferation or apoptosis within the cultures, quantitative assessments can be made of the ability of a drug to distribute in tumour tissue.

 

mcc multicolour 2

 

 

BIOGRAPHY



 

Appointments


  • Head, Radiation Biology Unit, Integrative Oncology Department
  • Distinguished Scientist, Radiation Biology Unit, Integrative Oncology Department

  • Assistant Professor, Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia

 


Previous appointments


  • Staff Scientist, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University

  • PDF Medical Biophysics, BC Cancer Research Centre, Vancouver

  • PhD Radiation Biology, University of London


 

Funding


Research in the Minchinton lab is funded by competitive peer-reviewed grants from:

  • The Wellcome Trust
  • Canadian Institute of Health Research
  • Canadian Cancer Society (via the Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute)

  • Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation / BC, Yukon
  • Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research

 

 

Publications (last update April 2016)